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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14
CSPAN
Aug 18, 2013 12:00pm EDT
and definitely effective. a lot of our regular customers -- it's like us said, the lesson supporters, but in the iowa, got this note. i got an ipad. it's so easy to get a book. we love to but have lost customers that way. not everybody does. we don't lose customers so much is it all by as much as they used to. a think receive a lot of the same people, but the purchases in the size they used to be. it is a constant question of our going to survive in this new environment. publishing, in a precarious position in some days. that's something we think about all the time. there is now resting on your laurels. we're constantly trying to a change and adapt to stay on top of things, like adding e-bucks to our website and having a website that you can order any kind of book on. something we work on all the time. we are on facebook now. we bring in new products. we have more things, nonbook items in the store that people really enjoy. we pay careful attention. we definitely have to stay on top of things and make sure we are checking where we should be going in not just consumer where you going
CSPAN
Aug 11, 2013 9:00pm EDT
. >> hi leigh. you've written a fascinating book everybody lives somewhere. and you're telling us the end of the suburbs. can you tell us about the subtitle? >> guest: the main idea behind the book is that more than half a century of expansion into the suburbs coming to know, the suburbs are more than any other place sort of the cultural pillar of america to read it embodies the american dream, it's very -- the image of the house in suburbia is what people strive for and where people live but that is changing coming and it's changing pretty dramatically. these changes have been slowly over time that every indicator you look at is showing this. we are tired of this way of life and the reasons behind that are numerous and complex and kind of draining away for a number of years. the debt indicators out there, the sort of sense of the american people who live in the suburbs were really looking at a sort of seismic change in how and where we live and i just thought that was a really momentous trend and one with delving into and so i did. >> host: i will be interested to hear about those in
CSPAN
Aug 12, 2013 12:00am EDT
fascinating book. everybody lives somewhere, and you're telling us where we live in america, the end of the suburbs. could you tell us about your title? >> guest: sure. the main idea behind the book is that after more than a half of a century of expansion into the suburbs, the suburbs are the sort of more than any other place, sort of cultural pillar of america. it's embodies the american dream. it's very -- the image of the house in suburbia is where most people live and strive for. but that is changing and it's changing pretty dramatically. these changes happen slowly but every indicator is showing this. we're tiring of this way of life, and the reason behind that are numerous, and they're complex, and they have been kind of grinding away for a number of years. but the data, the indicators out there, the sort of sense of american people who live in the suburbs, we're really looking at a seismic change in how and where we live, and i just thought that was a really momentous trend. >> host: i'll be very interested to hear about the indicators. first i wanted to know, what inspired you to wr
CSPAN
Aug 17, 2013 10:00pm EDT
one on the record about mandatory minimums and a federal court declared stop in for us to be unconstitutional so momentum is gathering. i think of structure and agency is interdependent. i think it would be messianic to think that my book on its own good raise consciousness but there clearly seems to be a current and i would hope that my book could contribute to a dawning sense that how we do criminal justice is somewhat insane and a moral atrocity. now with respect to where -- i haven't seen orange is the new black yet so where is it on the orange is the new black to the michelle i googled -- alexander spectrum? it's more about the new day and in fact the two men in graterford who read my manuscript repeatedly they might have been frustrated that it wasn't more explicitly policy oriented. i do think there are some policy conclusions that the book makes irresistible and i would hope that readers could come to those on their own. >> host: we can talk about sort of the way in which i think you raise criticisms and invite discussions about solutions. i remember a couple of years
CSPAN
Aug 4, 2013 9:00pm EDT
program is about an hour. >> speethree for being with us. >> i look forward to talking with you. >> let's talk about the basics. what is the status of broadband in america today? >> we have a picture that is quite different from the other developed nations. we have the high states of and download speeds in america cable monopolies, local monopolies and each region of the country that dominate that market and so for 85% of americans the only choice where they live is going to be at their local cable monopolists. we don't have any of the fastest 25 cities in the world when it comes to internet access in america so we are not in the world leaders we are somewhere in the middle of the pack and we also have a very deep digital divide. so having internet access at home is tied to your economic status some may be about half of people with incomes between 30, $50,000 a year have internet connections at home but that number is even lower with incomes under $30,000 a year. rich people tend to have internet access at home, and also 9% of americans can't buy internet access wherever they live because
CSPAN
Aug 11, 2013 12:00pm EDT
. high prices, i use digital divide internally and the country as a whole is fighting for connectivity. >> let's go back and talk about common carriage which does seem to be a way of thinking about it that would be satisfying some of our needs are broadband be read part of the origins? how is it executed? >> this is an ancient regime because of the way back to the evil era in europe. when you hold yourself out to the public it provides something essential and you are subject to out public obligations. so the whole idea that can not only from within but then travel to railroads and reaches the telephone industry in 1910 is that in exchange for essentially a private monopoly you to provide pitbull with services. you take on public burdens to charge a reasonable rate that serves everyone and to not discriminate when it comes to content and attachment. so this regime would still exist in law but has not been applied to the cable companies and void if applied to a high-speed internet access picture in america. the threats are digital divide. i want to focus more to begin with and the notion
CSPAN
Aug 4, 2013 11:00am EDT
that takes us from 1953 and kill really the late 1960s. and then the late 1960s is what i call the local war phase. that'that's an interesting day because at the end of the 1960s there was tremendous geological -- geopolitical changes taking place in asia. first of course the tet offensive which turned the americans against the war in vietnam. there was sino-american -- of course identity. the withdrawal of american troops from vietnam in 73. and, of course, china and the soviet union are coming to butt heads. there's a confrontation in 69. so because of these geopolitical changes in the since the cold war in asia was sort of coming to an end but interestingly the fight between north and south korea was actually heating up. at this point this is the beginning of south korea's rise to economic power. south korea is sort of taking off at this point. by contrast north creek on this is a big went the economy was starting to slow down. so kim jong-il saw the window of opportunity to unify with the south which was quickly closing pics we decide at that point to do a series of very provoc
CSPAN
Aug 25, 2013 12:00pm EDT
invites us to lender with the complexities. mary we could start, although it is not a story about you, it is your story of your experience. it is more than a dissertation. even for me it in your first response, how did you come to write this wonderful book about graterford, this particular present? >> i tend to think that people are largely a product of the circumstances because i myself am so acutely a product of my circumstances. those two, incarceration on the one hand to my child growing up in new york in the 1980's and 90's at a time when the american prison population is exploding, my mother worked rikers island. so i was aware from my young time and a young age about the phenomenon. i was always drawn and horrified by it in the way that one is drawn to something like a vocation. as for the other piece, i think religious studies is populated by people who tend to be emphatically ambivalence. i fit into that category. there was raised an orthodox jew , although it did not figure that out until later. in fact, my orientation both through judea's a man through american social justi
CSPAN
Aug 25, 2013 9:00pm EDT
fill in the hole in the sky that the trend powers used to fill. we should treat this land carefully and we should commemorate, but we shouldn't i think -- there wasn't a consensus or and open space but a lot of families worked very hard to make sure that some portion of land was put aside for a very substantial memorial. there is a kind of give-and-take in the process people have to make compromises and that was a big one for many families that they knew that something would be built and that would be developed when they wanted nothing. >> host: in most battles that we study in history there are the winners and losers and there are heroes and villains. in your book who do you focus on at the end of the day that turn out to be the hero in resolving this battle and who do you in one way or another focus on as a , not enemies but those who were obstacles to a successful getting to yes on the resolution of the battle? >> guest: it's a hard question. this process took so long and was so dysfunctional that there is almost no hero because everyone wants it entered in and it was kind of tar
CSPAN
Aug 10, 2013 10:00pm EDT
booktv, "after words." .. >> everybody live somewhere and you were telling us where we live in america the end of the suburbs. can you tell us about your title? guest of the main idea behind the book is that more than half a century of expansion into the suburbs the suburbs are at this sort of more than any other place the sort of cultural pillar of america. it embodies the american dream. it's the image of suburbia that people strive for and where most people live but that is changing. it's changing pretty dramatically. these changes happen slowly over time but every indicator you look at a showing this. we are tiring of this way of life and the reasons behind that are numerous and they are complex and they have been kind of grinding away for a number of years. but, the data the indicators out there, the sense of the american people who live in the suburbs we are really looking at a seismic change in how and where we live. i just thought there was a really momentous trends and one worth delving into so i did. >> host: i will be interested to hear about these indicators but fir
CSPAN
Aug 19, 2013 12:00am EDT
always invites us to linger with the come mixties a little bit more. maybe we can start -- although it's not a story about you, it is your story of your experience and the men you had a chance to build relationships with. it's more than a dissertation. you framed it in your first response, how did you come to write this wonderful book about greaterford, this prison, or religion in prison? >> guest: i tend to think that people are largely a product of their circumstances because i myself am so acutely a product of my circumstances. those two are known -- incarceration on the one hand, child growing up in new york in the 1980s and '90ss at a time when the american prison population is exploding, 600%, 700%, my mother worked at likers island so i was aware from a young time, young age, about the phenomenon as mass incarceration and was always drawn and horrified by it in the way that one is drawn to something like vocation. as for the other piece, i feel the studies are populated by people who tend to be emphatically ambivalent about the traditions of their upbringing. i was raised essentia
CSPAN
Aug 3, 2013 10:00pm EDT
: susan thank you for being with us. >> guest: i've been looking forward to talking with you. >> host: let's start with the basics. what is the status of broadband in america today? >> guest: the picture at america's quite different from the other developed nations. we have god for very high. >> and download. >> in america cable monopolies and local monopolies in each region of the country dominate that market. and for 85% of americans the only choice with a live will be their local cable monopolies. we don't have any of the fastest 25 cities in the world when it comes to internet access in america so we are not in the world's leaders. we are somewhere in the middle of the pack and we also have a deep digital divide so having an internet access at home is very tightly correlated to your socioeconomic status or maybe about half of the people with incomes between 30 and $50,000 a year have it at home and the number is lower for people with incomes under $30,000 a year. rich people tend to have internet access at home and also 9% of americans can't buy internet access wherever they live
CSPAN
Aug 18, 2013 9:00pm EDT
to get there but i think that what your story and perhaps the tone always invites us to linger with the complexities a little more. maybe we could start although it's not a story about you but your experience and the men that you had a chance to build relationships with. it's more than a dissertation. if you frame it in your first response, how did you come to write this wonderful book about the particular prison system or the religion in prison? >> guest: i tend to think people are a product of their circumstances because i am so acutely a product of my circumstances. those two modes of incarceration on the one hand, a child growing up in the 1980's and 90's had a time when the american prison population is exploding 600 or 700% and my mother among her others worked on rikers island so i was aware from the young time and at a younger age about the phenomenon of the mass incarceration. and i was always horrified by it in the way that one is drawn to something like a vacation. as for the other piece, i think the field of religious study is populated by people who tend to be emphatica
CSPAN
Aug 26, 2013 12:00am EDT
fill in the hole in the sky that the twin towers used to fill. there was a sen we should treat this land carefully, and we should commemorate, but we shouldn't, i think, there wasn't a consensus there should be just a park, for instance, or just open space. a lot of families were working hard to make sure some portion of land of put aside far substantial memorial, and it was hard, you know, in this kind of give and take and this kind of, i mean, a democratic process, people make comprises. that was a big one for many families. they knew something would be built and developed when they wanted nothing. >> host: in most battles we study in history there are winners and losers and heroes and villains. in your book, who do you focus on at the end of the day that turn out to be the heroes in resolving this battle, and who do you -- in one way or another focus on as not enemies but those who were obstacles to a successful getting to yes or the resolution of the battle. >> guest: it's a hard quest. the process was so long and so dysfunctional that there's almost no hero because everyone one
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14